Sales
Video

Next Level Sales Training

12 Lessons Easy

About this course

Brett Alegre-Wood's Next Level Sales Training

Course Structure

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Value Sales vs Consumer Sales

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The Most Powerful Sales Tool

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5 Outcomes of a Sales Call

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The Only 3 Reasons They Say NO!

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The 3 Parties On Every Sales Call

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2 Types of Sales Objections of How to Overcome Them

Transcription

Hey, guys, and welcome. So in this session, we're going to cover the 2 types of objections. Now, before I get started, let me just explain. Objections are some of the best things you're going to have happen because what objections do is they tell you exactly where your prospect is at. Yeah? So many sales people, I see they fear objections. They fear people asking the hard questions, but the reality is you're never going to get to that sale, so your whole sales process is useless unless you guide them through their objections. Okay. So this is absolutely one of the most positive things you can do in sales is take people through their objections because at the other end of the objections is, guess what? is a sale. So treat this, rather than being something that you don't really like or you wish they wouldn't come about, this is opportunity. You're getting closer and closer to the money, so do not at any level feel bad about this, because if you start having a negative opinion about this, that's going to come through on the phone and when that comes through on the phone or face-to-face, you're gonna lose a sale. Even though the sale may have been there, you'll lose it because you were negative, frustrated by their questions. Don't ever get frustrated or be negative about objections. They are absolutely positive. Now, let's have a look at the 2 types. So the first one is a stall objection. A stall objection is the things and... Put it this way. If I say to you, "How you going?" You're going to say, "Good." You're not going to think about it. You're not going to go, "Oh, Brett, well, I'm actually...this morning I was a little bit frustrated, but now I'm getting better." No, you're going to say, "Good." It's a throwaway answer. It means nothing. It adds no value to the conversation. Your prospect over time has developed amazing ways of stalling sales people. They're not real objections. Okay. That's these things. So you have stall objections and real objections. These are just preconditioned habits that they have that you need to just bulldoze through. You need to say, "I'll come to that later. We'll come to that in a minute. We'll deal with that later." The reality is that stall objection is not a real objection, so, actually, you don't have to treat it in the same way as a real objection. All right? Now, you might find, oh, but hold on, they've asked me a question, and I can't just...well, you can. If you identify that as a stall objection, then just bulldoze through it. Just say, "Hey, we'll come to that later. In fact, I'm going to address that later. Don't worry about it." Yeah? Boom and you move on. Now, you can do that with these because most people, it's not a real objection, so they're happy to go, "Oh, okay." Real objections, if you do this to a real objection, they're not with you. They have stopped there. They'll clam their feet in, and watch how quickly they get off the phone. Whether they're mentally off the phone or physically off the phone doesn't matter. You will have lost them. So a real objection, you have to stop and address it then and there because they're not coming any further on the journey with you until you address that. Now, the other thing you can do because you may find out they raise an objection you're going to address later on, so in which case ask for permission to delay it. So say, "Hey, Bill, I'm going to come to that. In fact, I'm going to come to that very soon, and I'll address it there. Are you okay if we park that right now and then we'll come back to it later? Now, if I don't come back to it, make sure that you raise this again because I will address it, but let's move on to the next thing. Yeah?" So get permission and then move on, but make sure you address it. Otherwise, there is no sale after that. Objections are such positive things. Unfortunately, as sales people we've reframed them somehow to be such negative things. It's rubbish, it's garbage, and don't fall for it. But learn these, what the difference is, and learn your rebuttals on each of these, especially these. If you find you're getting the same objection over and over again, make sure you've got a pre-formatted script or a way of answering that. We'll cover that in some of the sessions. Okay, guys, have a great day. Live with passion.

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Creating Leverage Through Automated Systems

Transcription

Welcome back, guys. The session today is on creating leverage through an automated system. Okay, so you're a salesperson. Fantastic. You're there, you're committed, you're going to bang away at the phones and do everything you possibly can. But I can guarantee you there is no possible way that you, standing alone, spending 8 to 12 hours a day, 5 days a week, or even 6 or 7 days a week, where you make 50 to 200 calls per day, 1,000 to 4,000 a month, that you can possibly be a successful salesperson compared to what we'll look at with a leveraged automated system. The reality is you want to be contacting clients every 90 days minimum. Okay. That's not your hotlist, that's your whole database. You want to churn through that every 90 days to remain top of mind, give them something of value to show that you're still interested in them, they're still hearing about you. Okay. That means, if we do the numbers, 3,000 to 12,000 database. That's a massive database. That's not quoting, that's not spending time building, nurturing, having long calls. Literally, that is just calling, calling, calling, calling, calling. Okay. And if all you're doing is booking an appointment, or a very quick one close, one call, then yeah, you could probably go through something like that, but this is breath, not depth. Now, we're going to talk a lot about value sales, where there's long-term buying cycle. So realistically, nurturing, continuous education over time, okay. So if you're going to do this, well, you're not going to get anywhere. You're not going to get the success. You're not going to get the sales. So what you need to do is leverage yourself, okay. You standing alone, fail. You using a system, and if we look at the solution, you know, up between 1990 and 2000, really the beginnings of computers, okay. Until 2010, we had a CRM, a Customer Relationship Management Database. Okay. Generally it was online, and it may not have been online, but for most people, they would have an online one. Okay. And what it did was store information to use. So actually you had that information. It'd come up, and you'd see this person so you don't have to remember thousands of facts about every single person. Okay, it tracked last activity, or history, you know, what's been going on. And it tracked next activity, what's upcoming, what you got planned. Okay. So with these things, the CRM was very effective. It allowed us to leverage ourselves, okay. But life got more complex, and so what you found was 2010 - 2015, we started to bring these automated marketing systems, okay. Websites really started to kick off and started to automate a lot of stuff, so track progress activity, respond automatically, so you didn't have to do anything. Someone goes onto your website and downloads a particular product brochure, or can do research into your product, a whole range of things, and then notify you at key points of action, because, obviously, if someone's just kicking tires, and you know they're not going to be there for the next sort of 12 months, 2 years, they're not in a position to buy, well, it doesn't necessarily require a salesperson to jump in at that point. But at certain key points, automated points that preset, they're the sort of things that you need to know and need to jump on. So if somebody downloads a particular book that says buying in the next week, well, that's when you want to know about it. And that's one of the keys to this automated system. Sending emails, doing a whole range of things: forms, content, a whole range of things. Then, in 2015, what changed a lot was it became almost essential to have a social presence. So now, the figures that are being quoted is over 70% of the research into your product and service is done before that client, or that prospect, actually speaks to you. Okay. So a website is essential, various content, bits of content, information. They want to download this before they speak to a salesperson. And having this system, this system, this system, as well as this hard work, discipline, organization, database hygiene, all these sort of things come together to form an automated system. Now, some of it isn't automated, some of it is still hard slog. I can guarantee you that if you get the hard slog right, this stuff will work for you. If you don't do this, this stuff's not going to work for you. Everything starts with you getting this stuff. In our particular instance, we use a CRM called Hubspot, an automated marketing system called Hubspot, and a social presence, obviously, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, which is what most people use. The whole system is built out so it does a lot of the thinking for you and actually represents the company and you in a very automated way. So the client doesn't necessarily have to speak to you, but you can see what's going on. You can make decisions based on that, and you can apply the appropriate strategy to taking that client from point A to point B, point B being, obviously, the sale, where we want to get them to. So guys, have a great day. Live with passion.

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Rapport Building - FORMS Questions

Transcriptions

Hey guys, Brett Alegre-Wood, and in this session, what we’re going to cover is rapport building. In particular, FORMS questions. Now what does FORMS questions mean? Well, FORMS is quite simply family, occupation, recreation, money, motivation, sports, specific. So what are you trying to achieve here? This is rapport. You're trying to build rapport. And in rapport, the key thing that determines success or failure in rapport is becoming I'm just like you. So the reality is you want to get across that you're just like them. You understand them. Not just to the superficial level. So yes, you can ask which sports team you support, and you can have a conversation about that. That's not building true rapport. You get through these whole range of questions, and this is all the sort of personal stuff, okay. Now yes, there is stuff where you can build a rapport in the company and things like that, but we're talking about specifically person to person, okay, because in a value sale, you are going to be needing to build a personal relationship, okay. There's none of this one close one calling. A lot of that's gone out the door now. People are doing a lot of research before they meet you, and then they're going to do a lot of research on the phone, and they want to know who they're dealing with. And so FORMS is the way to build rapport. So let me just take you through some of these. So family, talk about their family. Are they married? Do they have kids? How old are the kids? Do the kids go to school? What schools do they go to? All those stories. But remember, the key to rapport is it's not just about an interrogation. It's not you asking questions. The idea is you have to give of yourself, and the best way to get information is to say, "Hi, my name's Brett. What's your name?" Perfect sales technique for asking his name. Mess of human nature. And this is the way you do it. "Hey, I'm married. Are you?" In other words, I give a bit of information, and I get a bit of information. So I'm not saying you have to do this all the time. Some questions, you say, "Hey, by the way, are you married?" But then I would probably go in and say, "Yep, we're married, two kids, whatever, " okay? So bottom line is family asking family questions. Now obviously don't ask stupid questions that aren't in alignment with that. So for instance, "Is your wife good looking?" is not going to go down very well. But, "What does your wife do for a living?" if that's appropriate for what you're doing. So you got to come up with what's appropriate here. Occupation, talking about their job. Do they enjoy it? And it's not just about what is their job. "Oh, what do you do for a job? Oh great, builder, excellent." It's about then you understanding their job. So if you take that and someone says, "Oh you're a builder? Fantastic, hey construction industry's been a bit subdued through the recession. I hear it's picking up a lot. How's things going for you?" That's building depth in relationship and rapport, yeah? So that's the sort of stuff you want to do. So you're actually going to ask the headline question, the situation question, but then drive deep. The deeper you drive, the better the relationship, the bigger the emotional bank account, and the more I'm just like you, okay, and success. So recreation, what do they do with their spare time? Do they do fishing? Do they, favourite sports? Obviously that comes into here. Are they, what do they do? Do they play with their kids? Do they go particular places? Do they have a holiday home? Do head across to Spain, whatever it is, what do they do with their spare time, okay? Money, and what we're talking here now. Obviously, money, you can talk about income and things like that, but the reality is is you've got to watch this question because some people can be a little bit buzzy about it, and the last thing you want to do is be interrogating them, asking them lots of questions, giving lots of yourself on stuff they're not answering, okay? That's something that'll work for you. Motivation, what gets them up in the morning? What's driving them? Why are they speaking to you? Why have they signed up on your website? What is motivating them in life? Is it their kids? Is it something that was said to them about school? Do they want to prove this person wrong? Is it something like a lifelong dream, they've always dreamed of owning a house here, or whatever it is, okay? And sports, this is always a great icebreaker. What team do you support? The football, all that sort of stuff. And specific, which might be something that's going on that's appropriate. So it may well be recent tax changes, how they're affecting. It might be the recession. It might be the weather, how it's been so hot. Is that affecting your business, or is that affecting your recreation, whatever it is. So these are memory jogger. So if you're sitting there, and you go, "You know what? I need to build some relationship." Because remember, there's three reasons someone give you a no. No relationship, no need, and no...fuck. So remember there's three reasons why someone will say no to you. No relationship, no need, and fucking hell. And remember, there's reasons why someone will say no to you. No relationship, no need, no demonstrated competency. So that relationship, if you find that's lagging you got the participant and witness, and if the witness says, "Hey, rapport, rapport, relationship, " then go to one of these think family, occupation, recreation, money, motivation, sports, specific. And what I would have is three or four questions of each that are appropriate to driving your sales process forward. Okay guys, so let's sit down and let's make up some of these questions. And let's go through and come up with a list of question that we can actually ask that are appropriate to our sales call. Okay guys, have a great day. Live with passion.

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Why Persistence Still Pays Truckloads in Sales

Transcription

Hey, guys. Brett Alegre-Wood here to talk about persistence. Okay. I've been doing sales training since early '90s, okay. In 1990, I started and I had a slide on a PowerPoint presentation that was basically... in fact, it wasn't even PowerPoint. It was one of those OHP transparencies when we used to run this training sort of thing. But basically, in 1990, this sales training, I used to run, and one of those transparencies said 48% of people give up after the first rejection, yeah 25% give up after the second rejection, 12% give up after the third rejection, 5% give up after the fourth. So most sales are made between five and nine contacts. And do you know what the scary thing is? That that was in 1990. And I still see this in now, 2016, happening still. The stats still apply. Now, sure. I haven't done the exact stats, but you know what I find? This, there. And you know what this leads to? It means 10% of sales people earn 90% of the commission. I still see that across all businesses, and everyone I speak to, there's always a star performer. And that star performer has one key thing that makes him stand out, and that's that he never gives up. So if you want to be here rather than here, in giving up, then simply don't give up. Don't ever give up. We have the systems now. Back in the old days, we never had systems. Now we've got systems to follow up, to tell us when to follow up. We've got CRMs, the tellers, and flaggers. We've got automated systems that send emails out, reminders. All these things that mean, a lot of these are systemized. But no matter how good the system is, we still don't have robots. We still don't have AI. So the reality is you still have to make those calls. And you still have to accept the rejection, or not accept the rejection. Reject the rejection, because that's key. So guys, never give up. Never give up. Never give up. Never give up. Yeah? Never give up. Don't ever give up. And if you do that, you will start to become a sales person that earns the majority of the commission for your company. You'll be so valuable, they won't be able to afford to get rid of you. That should be every sales person's goal. That's what you should be achieving. Guys, have a great day. Live with passion.

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Nurture and the I Care Calls

Transcription

Hey, guys. Brett Alegre-Wood. In this session I want to cover nurture. Nurturing, because see interestingly, the Harvard Business School, and these stats go back to the early 1990s, okay. But amazingly, I still see these same stats come through day after day after day in my business. And it's amazing because we talk about more than 18 months. I've had people seven years say they've been following me for seven years. And then all of a sudden, they jump in and they buy. It's amazing. If I didn't have the system in place, I wouldn't get those sales. They would have long forgotten me. But because I'm so dedicated and so focused on a continuous and never ending education system, continuous contact, educational contact over time. But let's look at the things, 2% sign immediately. Now the reality is what I find in most sales people is that's where they deal and possibly here, 12%. So most sales people are focusing on 12% of the possible sales they've got, because why? They don't get in to here, 18% is three to six months, 24%. So 54% of the potential sales happen in the first year after they sign up, 54%. If your system doesn't allow for more than 12 months, than you're missing 46% of the total sales. Yeah? We talk about persistence, yeah? You have to keep on top of this. Now the great thing about things today, in the old days we used to have a Rolodex. And literally we used to have to put it in to a written calendar. But now, you've got a CRM and automated systems. So one of the key things to making this successful and making sure you make all these contacts is having an automated nurture system, or an automated education system combined with a series of IK calls. What do I mean by IK calls, or nurture calls? It means that you want to remain top of mind. Top of mind means maximum 90 days between contact, okay. And I'm not talking just emails or social media because actually that's not quite the same thing. I'm talking about adding some value to their lives and making sure you're put in front of them at least every 90 days. Now yes, you can use social media and a whole range of other technique, okay. We, in the old days, it used to be just the phone and literally handwritten notes or maybe faxes. Now, you've got a whole ammunition and a weaponry that you can use to automate, and to get in front of these guys' top of mind. That's the key here. Remain top of mind. Build value. Build education. Have educational contact every time because if you do that, then what happens is they like you. They see and like you. They want to deal with you. You've demonstrated your competency. You've built the relationship, and obviously identified the need. So guys, nurturing is absolutely key. And if you don't have a system, find a software or some sort of system and put it in place now. And if your company doesn't have it, then either get it yourself and use it yourself. Or just every 90 days as a minimum, have some sort of valuable contact with them. That doesn't mean you have to call them. It may well be that you leave a message. But that message say, "Hey, just checking in. Everything's fine with the market. If you've got any questions, give me a call. I'm always here whenever you need me." Yeah? And make sure they know that you're there. You're not being pushy. You're just reminding them. Top of mind. Top of mind. Top of mind. Top of mind, until they're ready to buy. And obviously, by adding the education in, they're going to be gradually increasing their level of education awareness of your product and service, awareness of the benefits they receive. What's in it for them, yeah? Guys, have a great day. Live with passion.

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Rapport Building - Match-Pace-Lead-Test

Transcription

Hey, guys. Brett Alegre-Wood. In this session what we're going to be covering is rapport building, okay. Specifically the technique of what I call Match-Pace-Lead-Test, okay. MPLT, all right? Now this is, we call this rapport building because it's a way of winning people to your way of thinking, okay. So you may want to head off in that direction but you know that they're heading in this direction. How do you get them to come away to your direction? And that's what this technique is about, okay. Now, this is a high level technique so I'm not going to go in to huge explanations but straight off this, what I want you to do is get in and actually really practice doing it and the technique of matching, and then pacing, and then leading, and then testing, okay. Now, what does that mean? Here's the visual. The first aspect is match. In other words, you want them walking beside you. So effectively the best way to do that is agree with them. So you may present a statement to them. You may present something to them that's, "Off-plan property is a great investment." And they may go, "Well, I'm not sure. A friend had this." Dada dada dadada, whatever. And he comes up with a whole heap of negative objections. Now you can go in to trying to prove him wrong. You can go in and say, "No, you're wrong, and this is right." That's a very confrontational, and you can do that. There is a technique that we'll teach you that is that. But that is not necessarily the best way to do that because the moment you go in a confrontation, the moment you say, "You're wrong, " at any level, I'm not saying you say, "You're wrong," but any time you say, "Well, no. I don't really agree with that." Or, "I'm not sure that's right." Or whatever it is that doesn't validate what he just said, then you're basically saying he's wrong. So here's the key with the match. The easiest way is just to read him, "Bill, I can understand how you explain, what, how you, I can totally understand how." F------- h---. So the best way, the best way to match is simply to agree with him. Now I'm not just saying, "Yeah, you're right." You don't have to say, "You're right." But you can say, "Look, I can totally understand where you're coming from. I can see why having been through that experience you can think that way." So what you're doing here is you're aligning with them. Because what that does, it drops the wall. Most sales people will go in to confrontation. They'll say, "No, you're wrong, and this is why I'm right." What happens is as soon as you say, "You're wrong, " the wall comes up, communication stops. You might as well hang up the phone. What we're doing here is we're aligning with them at this point. And then what the pace is, that's about building depth in the understanding and the alignment. And in doing that, what we're doing is we're saying, "Right, off-plan. I can see, Bill, you're friend lost money in off-plan, " and, "What did he do? Was he doing research? How did he lose it? Was it with a particular company? Did he do it himself? Was it because the market turned or was it because the develop went bust?" What were the reasons behind it? So I'm pacing here. I'm exploring why he thinks this. What happened? Because what I want to do now, once I've paced a bit and I've got that rapport, that relationship, then I can lead him off in the direction I want to go. Okay. And this is the key here. This is all about building rapport. And the best way to build rapport is by saying, "I'm like you. I agree with you. I think like you." Okay. One of the other techniques we'll talk about is forms. And you can use the forms type of questions. But this is a specific technique to move them from that direction to this direction that you want them to head in or that you may need them to head in in order to buy. So what do we mean? Match, pace, lead. So lead is then take him off. So going, "Bill, I understand all that. And your friend did this, and then now we've talked about that. But have you ever considered..." Now what have I just done? I'm now in to my lead. "Have you ever considered?" I'm not saying, "This is my way of thinking and I'm right." I'm saying, "Have you ever considered?" Because that's a lot softer in taking him. Now I'm going to develop some depth in this. I'm going to say, "Have you ever considered these points, or this process? Have you ever heard of this story?" Or, "I have a client who has this story." You're leading them off in the direction you want to go. And then the test is simply testing him, "Now, Bill, can you see my point of view? Can you see how that would be a benefit to you?" "Well, absolutely I can." Great, you've just tested. So that is the match, pace, lead, test. It's a lot better technique than saying, "You're wrong. I'm right. Shut up and listen, and come this way." It just ain't going to work for you. Okay. Not in this day in age with the educated consumer.

Okay, guys. Have a great day. Live with passion.

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Rapport Building - Feel, Felt, Found

Transcription

Hey guys, Brett Alegre-Wood. In this session, rapport building, and in particular, feel, felt, found. So this is actually going to be a really quick session, because this is a way of building rapport. If you want to win someone to your way of thinking, then this is a really good technique to do. Now, I wouldn't use this a lot, but it's a simple structure, and you can use it. Basically, it goes like this. John, I know how you feel. This is how I would feel as well, or this is how... [bleep]. Hey guys, Brett Alegre-Wood, rapport building, and in particular, we're going to go through feel, felt, found. This will be a relatively quick session because it's a very simple to understand concept. So, here we go. All right. This is a great way to winning people to your way of thinking, and it's a simple statement. So all you can do is, they'll come up and they'll say something, and you go, "John, I totally understand how you feel. I felt the same way, but this is what I found." So it's a simple process of taking them from heading in one direction to getting them open to moving to another direction. The good thing here is this "I felt, " and, "This is what I found," so you're talking about your own personal experience. So you're not going to use this, necessarily, if you're talking about somebody else, or that. It's a really simple technique to move them to your way of thinking. Okay, guys, have a great day. Live with passion.

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